1. 21:10 20th Apr 2014

    Notes: 73

    Reblogged from comicsalliance

    image: Download

    comicsalliance:

More Than Just Crime: Five Noir Comic Books You Need to Read
The idea of “noir” generally evokes a certain image in the modern audience: black and white, guns and dames, crimes and lowlifes. Real noir, however, goes deeper, exploring the nooks and crannies of fear and desperation. Crime is a common outlet for this sort of storytelling, but there are as many types of noir as there are genres of fiction.READ MORE

Hey, I wrote this a while back!

    comicsalliance:

    More Than Just Crime: Five Noir Comic Books You Need to Read

    The idea of “noir” generally evokes a certain image in the modern audience: black and white, guns and dames, crimes and lowlifes. Real noir, however, goes deeper, exploring the nooks and crannies of fear and desperation. Crime is a common outlet for this sort of storytelling, but there are as many types of noir as there are genres of fiction.

    READ MORE

    Hey, I wrote this a while back!

     
  2. 20:51

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from whiskeyandfailure

    image: Download

    whiskeyandfailure:

Chatham Light, Cape Cod, Easter 2014

I should mention my photo blog more often.
I have a photo blog.

    whiskeyandfailure:

    Chatham Light, Cape Cod, Easter 2014

    I should mention my photo blog more often.

    I have a photo blog.

     
  3. This is brutal. I love it.

     
  4. 18:20 15th Apr 2014

    Notes: 200

    Reblogged from tompeyer

    tompeyer:

    The space hairdresser and the cowboy

     
  5. 09:50

    Notes: 5

    image: Download

    Good job, Reuters. I had to fix it for you.

    Good job, Reuters. I had to fix it for you.

     
  6. I like Broad City.

     
  7. image: Download

     
  8. 17:11

    Notes: 120

    Reblogged from cinephilearchive

    cinephilearchive:

    Edwin Adrian Nieves’ A Bitter Sweet Life invite you to explore the life and works of Akira Kurosawa with the Akira Kurosawa Digital Archive:

    “The archive, put together by Kurosawa’s estate and Ryukoku University Digital Archives Research Center, is an amazing digital collection of over twenty thousand pages of Kurosawa’s screenplays, photos, storyboards, drawings, notes, newspaper clippings, personal scribblings and other materials. Among the high quality scans you can find unfilmed screenplays, screenplay drafts that were later revised, production memos and notes, continuity drawings, and much much more. While most of it is in Japanese, there are also some English documents, and of course plenty of pictures to check out.”

    “Akira Kurosawa possessed a masterful awareness of the filmmaking process, and those working close to him considered editing to be among his greatest talents. The renowned director even declared that he would shoot a film simply to edit, because for him editing was the foundation of a film and the most creative and interesting part of the process. The following words on editing and Phil Baumhardt’s Profiles in Editing: Akira Kurosawa exemplify the filmmaker’s profound understanding of ‘the invisible art’ while the latter closely studies Kurosawa’s editing style and techniques in ‘Seven Samurai.’” —Akira Kurosawa and the Art of Editing

    • “Film editing involves putting on the finishing touches. More than this, it is a process of breathing life into the work.”
    • “The most important requirement for editing is objectivity. No matter how much difficulty you had in obtaining a particular shot, the audience will never know. If it is not interesting, it simply isn’t interesting. You may have been full of enthusiasm during the filming of a particular shot, but if that enthusiasm doesn’t show on the screen, you must be objective enough to cut it.”
    • “No matter how much work the director, the assistant director, the cameraman or the lightning techicians put into a film, the audience never knows. What is necessary is to show them something that is complete and has no excess. When you are shooting, of course, you film only what you believe is necessary. But very often you realize only after having shot it that you didn’t need it after all. You don’t need what you don’t need. Yet human nature wants to place value on things in direct proportion to the amount of labor that went into making them. In film editing, this natural inclination is the most dangerous of all attitudes. The art of the cinema has been called an art of time, but time used to no purpose cannot be called anything but wasted time.”

    “‘There is nothing that says more about its creator than the work itself.’ Taking his own words to heart, one can see that Akira Kurosawa was truly a filmmaking artist. With over 30 feature films that range from samurai and noir to crime and drama, Kurosawa shows a mastery over the process, a mastery that occurs with a combination of talent and being able to see beyond the means at hand. His skill and ability to attune himself to the experience of making a film is highlighted in the wonderful and essential 80 minute documentary ‘A Message from Akira Kurosawa: For Beautiful Films.’

    The documentary explores in-depth Akira Kurosawa’s approach to filmmaking. Divided into 10 chapters, the viewer journeys through the many stages of filmmaking—from ‘Cinematic Material’ to ‘Scripts,’ ‘Storyboards,’ ‘Shooting a Movie,’ and ‘Lighting,’ to ‘Art Direction,’ ‘Costumes,’ ’Editing,’ ‘Music,’ and ‘Directing’—as Kurosawa discusses the insight he has gathered during his career. An idea for a film, he believed, was like a plant that forms naturally. He also placed much attention to his collaborators, listening to them while allowing them to see edits of the film in production in order to encourage their spirits.

    All that Kurosawa experienced was to lead him closer to his ideal of film, a realization of a ‘beautiful movie’ founded in pure cinema, in which themes and messages were subordinate to the specific and artistic qualities of cinema. Dive into the depths of filmmaking with ‘A Message from Akira Kurosawa: For Beautiful Films’, a masterclass in the art of cinema from one of its greatest artists.” —A Message from Akira Kurosawa: For Beautiful Movies

    “Obviously, directing is different from writing a script. It’s quite different from drawing storyboards. It’s not possible to direct with words. One directs with living human beings.” —Akira Kurosawa

    For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

     
  9. The only heavy metal video you need.

     
  10. What did we learn today?